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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the results already by the people that have come out early and that's why the campaigns spent so much time on getting out the vote early, this ground game on these early votes. >> pelley: we'll come back to you early and often. john dickerson is our cbs news political director. john is going to be showing us the various ways that the candidates can get to the 270 electoral votes necessary to twin presidency. john? >> well, first, scott, let's follow up on what bob was saying. we're going to dispatch with 41 of the states, the majority of the country cbs estimates based on the polling that those states are either going to go to barack obama or to mitt romney. that gives barack obama a start where he's likely to get 237 electoral votes, mitt romney is likely to get 191 electoral votes. so here we are at the beginning of the evening, nothing ha
to pump more money, more stimulus into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania, california than any institution. they may be more important than the fed. we have to look at money and politics. >> this is interesting. the comments from all four speakers. i want to ask about a demographic group that none of you touched on. one out of every five americans has a disability. 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. at the national press club when there was an opportunity for the romney campaign and the obama campaign to send someone to speak about disability issues, the romney campaign chose not to attend and chose not to issue a position paper on disabilities. i wanted to ask why, given that one out of five americans has a disability, 51% of american likely voters has a family member or a loved one, why is there not more conversation about that demographic within our society and election process? >> the short answer is in an election that revolving around the role of government, if your for small government, why would you
they went to nevada, colorado, iowa, wisconsin, ohio, virginia and new hampshire and these are the ones who have been the surrogates with mrs. obama, no, my husband is not a cold fish. we have dinner every night with the kids. you should know him. you should see that smile. i love him. you should love him. mrs. romney who is very close to her husband in the strategy, she plays a bigger role than just being the wife of, she is the one who said, he is not a stiff man. look at us. and, by the way, you talked about the grandchildren. there are 18 grandchildren. 13 of them are boys. >> all right. let us put that to the decision desk and see what that means. okay, barbara, stand by, team. we know you have so much more you're eager to say and we'll take a break at election night headquarters 2012 reporting on one of the great nights in democracy, one of the great privileges it is to vote as the polls still are open and a lot of this country projections come in and we have more, of course, to report on what social media is saying when we come back. >> announcer: multitouchscenes courtesy of microso
in nevada and colorado. nevada is a pathway to 270 without ohio. i think the post-mortem on this is that -- if the republicans don't win, a look a thow they dealt with the latino vote and the language they used and the perception that is created. the latino vote is one of the pillars of the obama strategy. and a big turnout like the president said -- this is a reason why he wins. he was playing the analyst and acts like he doesn't do it publically. >> the best visual we've seen about the changing face of american politics -- the percentage of the vote white voters make up. it is down 3-4 points each election adn this will continue a long time. it was a reality they could blow off but they can't win without improving those numbers. >> you saw rubio try to do that -- >> and -- it was such a moment. really. and if we see, if republicans are serious about that, they will get serious about immigration reform. >> i will make a prediction if romney doesn't win. this is the last time we see a major party ticket with two white men on it. it will be almost automatic you have
close. and labor aint dead. laver played a big role in helping obama and nevada and wisconsin as well as an ohio. the popularity of the auto bailout is hard to overstate. that a little bit from politico. now we want to hear from you. we will begin with a call from woodbridge, virginia on our line for democrats. good morning. go ahead. caller: good morning. i am calling it, as my first time calling c-span. a have been listening for several years. and i feel like i have to make a call today. my comment would be, i voted for obama, and a first-time voter. i just became a citizen of this year. the democratic party, i have been here for two years, and this democratic party stands for us all, it helps the poor people of. like obama said, trying to help people come up to the middle class. the republican party stands for the rich. it claims to be a christian party. these people call themselves christians. but the abuse, the idea as, is not designed to help the poor. it is for the rich. so people like myself, i would never aligned with this party. host: tell us about your experience boating an
seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington, nevada, something good could happen for them. but it's going to be hard for the democrats to take over the house. >> brown: there a particular one or two you want to keep your eye on especially tonight? >> a lot of the demographic data we're looking at democrats have area where's they can gain, perhaps later on down the line, arizona, texas, as sturks mentioned, florida is another one, where the democrats are look at making long-lasting gains. they're making new seats. california is another one we will be watching. what is the bigger picture when it comes to the type of members of congress? are these people extreme on one part or the other? the way the lines are drawn that can happen. if you draw a district with extreme democrat or republican, you can end up with extremes in congress. >> woodruff: mark, you were telling me you were off the set talking to somebody, picking up some information about how the vote is coming in. >> the turnout right now is that what tino voters are voting at the levels that the obama people
, but it think it will be tough to overcome the top of the ticket impact. >> stay out west in nevada, third congressional district. >> joe heck, the congressman, this is the type of district the democrats should be challenging in if they wanted to win the majority. this is suburban las vegas clark county district come place where democrats should be doing very well. and write the democrats are having a tough time going after joe heck. democratic nominee is john, a former leader in the statehouse, but what's interesting is even though he has the influential position in the state legislature from its after talking talking about his record as a firefighter. they're not even mentioning that he's a politician because that label is not one to want to have. answer right now joe heck has the advantage that if democrats are having a better night than we expect, they would need to do better in this type of district's. california is a solid blue state for the president. but a couple of interesting house races in that state. >> well, california normally as handicappers we can almost ignore the state ev
, wisconsin, nevada, new hampshire. i think we've got an even chance of winning virginia and florida. so it could be a big win. don't just vote. bring your mom, your dad, cousin, knock on the door of your neighbor. let me tell you something, the middle class depends on it. >> joining me from the battleground state of ohio is our own national treasure, chris matthews. it's always great to see you. congratulations on the interviews. how much of that confidence is genuine and how much is spin in the homestretch? >> he felt confident when i talked to him off camera. of course, north carolina, new hampshire and colorado are up in the air. he said virginia and florida would be tough, as well. did you notice the discordance on the right wing of getting along with the other side? on the one hand, the romney is saying we should get along with the other side saying he could work with a republican congress. of course he can, he's a republican. then you have rupert murdoch trashing the governor of new jersey for the same thing, working with the other side. the times of london endorsed obama, so what
that top-of-the-ticket impasse. >> in nevada. >> johann eck, this is because the district the democrats should be challenging if you want to win a majority. this is a suburban, loss vegas- clark county district. right now, democrats are having a tough time going after heck. the democratic nominee is a former leader in the state house. he has an influential position in the state legislature. he has a record as a firefighter. they are not even mentioning that he is a politician because of that label is not when you want to have. right now, heck has the advantage, but it democrats have a better night than we expect, they would need to do better in this type of district. >> california is a solid blue state for the president, but a couple of interesting house races in that state. >> california, we can almost ignore the state come even though it is the largest state. there have only been one or two seats that had a chance of one party taking over the other. but the citizen legislator redistricting commission and the top two primary that has been turned on its head. democrats need to almost sw
what a difference our efforts made in key states like ohio and wisconsin and nevada. >> i think without the efforts of organized labor, those three states would have been different. >> alisyn: that was the president of the afl-cio taking partial credit for the president's reelection win. exit polls show that he's right. let's take a look at the support from union households in three key swing states. the president won by 22 points in ohio. 32 points in wisconsin. and there was a 17-point spread in nevada. so what does president obama now owe the unions for supporting him? joining us is the author of "shadow boxing, government unions control america and rob taxpayers blind," mallory factor. nice to see you again. >> good to see you. >> alisyn: so that was richard trumka taking a victory lap, basically saying they turned out lots of support for the president. the president wouldn't have won without him. is he overstating the case? >> no. he's understating the case. it is unbelievable the amount of resources that the unions put out. they gave him a half a billion dollars and they had 400,0
. >> that's plan c. wisconsin and iowa, colorado, new hampshire and nevada were plan b. >> one of them is gone. let's talk about florida. because you guys have been numbers crunching like crazy. it's interesting to comparing them to what they were four years ago. what is your sense, karl? identified that miami-dade and broward counties and palm beach the democratic strongholds in the south. obama is doing better in those. he is doing a little less than big urban centers of the i4 corridor. tampa saint peter and orlando and less well in the urban counties in the i4 corridors and worse in the southwest corner of the state and up in the north. the real one is the panhandle where he is running further behind where he did four years ago. walton county got 26% of the vote. now 23.7% of the vote. romney is getting 3 1/2 points better than -- but this race right now is settled. million people having voted is 2000 votes apart. i think at the end of the day it's about-- in--t me brin >> this has been going back and forth. the interesting thing is in the counties where obama is doing a s doing or
new hampshire, pennsylvania, wisconsin, iowa, colorado, nevada, any of those. >> five. >> in the 3-2-1 strategy be virginia is one of the three. if you don't win virginia, how much of a problem? >> they're blocked. that is the strategy -- a lot of the electoral strategy was to block romney in the 3-2-1. can they block him in ohio and win that? can they block him in virginia? if they win virginia or ohio, either one, starts to make it tough. unless some other -- you start to change the strategy. >> quickly, virginia must-win for romney? >> it would be great to win it. historically republican. the opposite strategy is not only focus on 3-2-1 but keep broadening the battlefield. wisconsin, pennsylvania, iowa, colorado, nevada, new hampshire, minnesota. states that come in to play at one time or another. and so you would never want to be only have, one group of states you want as many alternatives as possible. insurance policies if you will. >> so, space cowboys you can stand down for a moment and crumple numbers. calling your sources. bret, it's 3-2-1 or it isn't. >> bret: there you g
money, more stimulus into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, any institution. they may be more important than the fed. we have to look at money and politics. >> this is interesting. the comments from all four speakers. i want to ask about a demographic group that none of you touched on. one out of every five americans has a disability. 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. at the national press club when there was an opportunity for the romney campaign and the obama campaign to send someone to speak about disability issues, attend and chose not to issue a position paper on disabilities. i wanted to ask why, given that one out of five americans has a disability, 51% of american likely voters has a family process? >> the short answer is in an election that revolving around the role of government, if your you want to get into a conversation about how do you assist people with disabilities role for government which might mean a program, which might mean money. it is not a conversation you want to engage before an electi
a disadvantage to start with. latino vote which is huge. look at florida, colorado, nevada. you could even argue iom. state after state, the latino vote if you take it out, democrats would've lost. even in florida, 61, 39. cuban-americans are no longer the majority in florida among latinos, but also the younger generation of cuban-americans in setting puerto rican or dominican latinas. they're not voting that the anti-castro parents and grandparents. asian-americans is a big issue. 75, 25 for obama. i remember covering the race. bush actually won the asian-american vote before september 11, asian-american vote was the swing vote leading republican. yesterday was three to one democratic. urban rural are mere images and is roughly 6040. demographically which areas, you wouldn't want to bet on rural america, the population center going ahead. young and old. it is again the youngest voters are the most pro-obama. although i will say that he seemed to 21 voters are less pro-obama than the people slightly older than they are, the 21 to 30. but still, which would you rather have? young voters were 60,
that republicans have four hispanic governors including in the big battleground states of nevada and new mexico, they have five female governors, democrats only have one female governor-elect coming in in 2013. you have a lot more diverse see twin the gubernatorial ra*pb ranks race. jon: "newsweek" put out a cover, the gop, too old, too white, to male. you're saying it's not that at all in the governor's race. >> in policy matters and image matters. when you have future republican leaders like susanna martinez in new mexico who got much acclaim from her convention speech in tampa. she is a big favor for re-election and will be on the scene to come. these are the kinds of office oldest that republicans will be well served to put out front and center. if they need to diversify ranks in congress they need to look at a lot of strategy the governors have used back home. jon: it will be interesting to watch. josh, thank you. jenna: we're keeping an eye on a big story that is developing overseas right now. hamas rockets are range down on israel, and one just reaching the outskirts of tel-aviv raising
committee. tony is our next caller in las vegas, nevada. caller: hi. on the fiscal cliff, this has been the unspoken agenda of the democratic party for a long time. they want the fiscal cliff. it does essentially what they wanted to do, which is to raise taxes and impose a bunch of reductions in military spending. we all know that raising taxes on the rich will not raise enough money to substitute for a dollar rates on middle-class. -- raise. no tax on the super rich would ever recover enough money to even begin averting the financial clip. no reduction in foreign aid -- it is just less than 1% of the federal budget -- can address the fiscal cliff. we need to begin talking exactly the opposite of the way the federal government has worked so far. simply by starting with a budget on what we expect the income-tax to be instead of starting with what we would like to spend. that is backwards. you have to start with what you expect your income to be. host: here is what charlotte says on facebook. she says the tax rates are not creating any jobs, so stop talking out of both sides of your mouth
. >> callerare you there? we will try paul and boulder city nevada back your democrats line. paul, hello? >> caller: thank you for c-span. watching the president's comments, he's not going to take a hardline on whether the attacks which are going to go back to the clinton era. i don't understand why this president is not, i mean, as before, i hope we're not seeing a repeat, you know, the progressives and liberals really push him over the line along with labor. you know, he's got to take a stronger stance because the republicans, mitch mcconnell and cantor and boehner, they are not, you know, really acknowledging that the people have sent the message to them. that they want this president agenda, and they want them to work together. they are not acknowledging that. okay, i understand what he's trying to say to take your of the middle class first, but as far as i'm concerned, you know, 39.6%, you know, is more than reasonable. i think after they've had almost 12 years of tax breaks and 300% growth in the last 30 years in the upper 1%, i think they ought to be paying maybe 40%. >> host: pau
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)